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Teens Human Factors Harmfully Affect Their Driving

Do you know:

* Of teen drivers fatally injured in automobiles, more than 1/3 were speed related accidents.

* Teen lifestyle of staying up late make teen drivers a high risk to have an automobile accident due to drowsiness.

* More than any age group, teens are likely to be involved in a single vehicle crash.

The main causes for automobile accidents among teens point to human factors commonly found in 16 and 17 year olds. These factors influence a wide range of teenager driving habits.

When studied separately, the number of automobile crashes each human factor influences is low when compared with national motor vehicle accident and fatality totals. But collectively, they paint a picture about teen drivers that is not pretty.

For instance, drowsiness when driving. Teen drivers are a higher risk to drive when drowsy than older drivers. Teenagers do not get as much sleep as they should. Drowsiness impairs judgment and is likely to be a factor when teens drive at night.

Other human factors impact teen driving results, too.

* Teens start out as new drivers with limited on-the-road experience.

* When teenagers drive with passengers, their level of crashes increase as much as 3 times the number of crashes teens commit with no passengers.

* Distractions in the automobile interrupt their concentration from the road.

* Unanticipated road events sometimes create situations beyond a teenager's skill to manage.

* Teen driving fatalities related to speeding also exceed the rate of older drivers. A teenager's likelihood to not wear safety belts increases their risk.

Collectively, the above human factors reflect poor judgment choices teenagers make that older, more experience drivers commit less often.

Finally, one way to help teen drivers drive safely is to be able to detect when your teen is driving in a way you do not approve. To learn more and know how to detect when a teen driver is operating the automobile incorrectly or in an unsafe manner, click The main causes for automobile accidents among teens point to human factors commonly found in 16 and 17 year olds. These factors influence a wide range of teenager driving habits.

When studied separately, the number of automobile crashes each human factor influences is low when compared with national motor vehicle accident and fatality totals. But collectively, they paint a picture about teen drivers that is not pretty.

For instance, drowsiness when driving. Teen drivers are a higher risk to drive when drowsy than older drivers. Teenagers do not get as much sleep as they should. Drowsiness impairs judgment and is likely to be a factor when teens drive at night.

Other human factors impact teen driving results, too.

* Teens start out as new drivers with limited on-the-road experience.

* When teenagers drive with passengers, their level of crashes increase as much as 3 times the number of crashes teens commit with no passengers.

* Distractions in the automobile interrupt their concentration from the road.

* Unanticipated road events sometimes create situations beyond a teenager's skill to manage.

* Teen driving fatalities related to speeding also exceed the rate of older drivers. A teenager's likelihood to not wear safety belts increases their risk.

Collectively, the above human factors reflect poor judgment choices teenagers make that older, more experience drivers commit less often.

Finally, one way to help teen drivers drive safely is to be able to detect when your teen is driving in a way you do not approve. To learn more and know how to detect when a teen driver is operating the automobile incorrectly or in an unsafe manner,click The main causes for automobile accidents among teens point to human factors commonly found in 16 and 17 year olds. These factors influence a wide range of teenager driving habits.

When studied separately, the number of automobile crashes each human factor influences is low when compared with national motor vehicle accident and fatality totals. But collectively, they paint a picture about teen drivers that is not pretty.

For instance, drowsiness when driving. Teen drivers are a higher risk to drive when drowsy than older drivers. Teenagers do not get as much sleep as they should. Drowsiness impairs judgment and is likely to be a factor when teens drive at night.

Other human factors impact teen driving results, too.

* Teens start out as new drivers with limited on-the-road experience.

* When teenagers drive with passengers, their level of crashes increase as much as 3 times the number of crashes teens commit with no passengers.

* Distractions in the automobile interrupt their concentration from the road.

* Unanticipated road events sometimes create situations beyond a teenager's skill to manage.

* Teen driving fatalities related to speeding also exceed the rate of older drivers. A teenager's likelihood to not wear safety belts increases their risk.

Collectively, the above human factors reflect poor judgment choices teenagers make that older, more experience drivers commit less often.

Finally, one way to help teen drivers drive safely is to be able to detect when your teen is driving in a way you do not approve. To learn more and know how to detect when a teen driver is operating the automobile incorrectly or in an unsafe manner.
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Comments

This is very interesting..as a teen driver myself I understand where you get this from..I tend to limit my passengers to 1-2 people so I am not as distracted..

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